OOM #7 – I Was a Teenage Serial Killer (1993)

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I wrote about this short film as it’s part of my list of films to see that belongs to the horror genre, going chronologically from the last film that we reviewed here as part of the October Overlook Madness. Let’s continue on!

This short film looks crudely made, but behind it there’s an anarchic voice that hadn’t been let out into the world as strong as this one, at least into the world of film. Directed by Sarah Jacobson, the film is filled with hateful violence aimed towards a common subject of today, but which at the time wasn’t really thought of in that manner, at least not in the open manner that’s spoken of today. A 19-year old girl is fed up with the men that surround her, so she just decides it’d be better if she just murders every heterosexual male man that she finds. Particularly telling of the ideology behind this short film is when she finally finds a man that she might like (a man that is also repulsed by heterosexual men), and we see a montage (stock montage music included) of them getting to know each other, having some food, holding hands, killing and dismembering people, all as a way of bonding with each other. The relationship ends when our protagonist notices that her partner is dragging a woman inside their house for its dismemberment and raping, and he confesses that “killing women sometimes is fun too”, and thus she gets to murder what she thought could be the love of her life. The black and white cinematography and the 16mm feel gives it an underground quality which enhances the violence and gives it a quota of realism which makes the whole thing a bit stomach churning at times, even if the special effects aren’t necessary stellar or realistic at all. Sarah Jacobson has lately been championed as one of the most interesting feminist artists of the 90s, and even though she only made this short and another feature film before her death, she’s considered one of the visionaries, working with the tools of horror to convey a message that resonates now more than ever.

8/10

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